Home » Threatened Species » The Orange House Project Saving Lebanon’s Sea Turtles

The Orange House Project Saving Lebanon’s Sea Turtles

10687880_694011047342905_2386094810488202020_oFor millennia, sea turtles have swum ashore every summer to lay their eggs on beaches in what is now southern Lebanon. After incubation, the hatchlings race across the sand from their nests to the sea at night. A chance encounter with a sea turtle one night in 1999 inspired Mona Khalil to create the conservation project at Mansouri and Qoleileh that is unique in Lebanon.

Great blue heron encountered near the turtles beach
Great blue heron encountered near the turtles beach
Mona, then living in the Netherlands, had returned to Lebanon to visit her family’s beachfront farm. One moonless night, she was amazed to spy a green turtle laying eggs on the beach – and when she discovered that turtles were in danger of vanishing from Lebanon, she immediately knew what she would do when she came back to live there.
For the second time Orange House project are having a workshop. More than 40 young people were trained to save turtles
For the second time Orange House project are having a workshop. More than 40 young people were trained to save turtles on 30 August 2014
Imagine a history dating back 100 million years, the story of an animal that has succeeded where the almighty dinosaurs failed: survive, despite climate changes. Today, a greater threat to the turtle, a danger that was not intended by nature: the destructive hand of man. In Lebanon, it was barely mentioned until the day when a woman met them by chance on a beach in the South. Her life was transformed, she was committed to their cause. Meeting with Mona el Khalil and her protected fragiles.

The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) are two endangered species that lay their eggs on Lebanon’s beaches. (read more about them here)  After they’ve hatched and begun their solitary journey in the ocean, female turtles return to the same shore they were born in after about 25 years to nest their eggs. The alteration of those sites modifies the turtles’ birth rate behaviors drastically… noting that a decrease in the population could lead to an imbalance in the marine ecosystem.

6 September 2014:  After sorting the 9th and the last Caretta nest they found : 11 unfertilized , 2 dead in with an embryo , 6 dead in and 41 successful hatchlings that will be released
6 September 2014: After sorting the 9th and the last Caretta nest they found : 11 unfertilized , 2 dead in with an embryo , 6 dead in and 41 successful hatchlings that will be released

Hosting 80 nests in 2006 and only 30 in 2013, this reserve needs our help because as bad as it is, local investors want to turn it into yet again another useless private resort.
 Let’s fight for Al Mansouri beach and let’s save the last turtle sanctuary in Southern Lebanon.

 

The end of this years turtle's season the  last Caretta caretta nest is definitely going home . 6 September 2014
The end of this years turtle’s season the last Caretta caretta nest is definitely going home .
6 September 2014

It is very important to understand that by trying to protect this we are not trying to save our natural resources or what is ours, but what is for the planet itself. These beaches are merely even ours, they are a home for species that are beyond us humans.

10628689_695838363826840_8991279054390575725_o 10608359_685727671504576_5944820165817373049_o 10583008_696342223776454_3099880351055506650_o 10582859_685701778173832_132287752412599730_o 10575363_692167724193904_3925224214663053686_o 10575311_694870467256963_8873781507615438402_o 1556345_694005210676822_8544029576264003789_o

Check Also

US desert songbirds at risk in a warming climate

Projected increases in the frequency, intensity and duration of heatwaves in the desert of the …

%d bloggers like this: